Monthly Archives: October 2014

Mindfulness & Person-Based Cognitive Therapy for Psychosis

Presenter: Professor Paul Chadwick1,2,3

This workshop will focus on practical and theoretical issues in using mindfulness as both a formal practice, and as a means of informing therapy for people with distressing psychosis.

VENUE: All Hallows College, Gracepark Road, Dublin 9.

Friday 12th December 2014

9.30am – 4.30pm

Lunch Provided

What benefits can you expect from this workshop?

People most likely to benefit are those with good general experience using CBT or mindfulness-based therapies.

Key learning objectives:

(1) To understand how to adapt mindfulness practice for people with distressing psychosis

(2) Learn how Person-Based Cognitive Therapy integrates mindfulness with CBT for psychosis

 

Training modalities: Didactic, small group exercise, client DVD, experiental

Biography: Professor Chadwick is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. He has been at the forefront of the development of psychological therapy for psychosis for over 25 years, and has pioneered the integration of mindfulness with cognitive therapy for psychosis.

 

Background: Person-Based Cognitive Therapy (PBCT) is an approach to distressing psychosis that seeks to integrate cognitive therapy with mindfulness principles and practice. The workshop will describe how mindfulness and cognitive therapy are formulated within PBCT, and explore how mindfulness principles inform the therapeutic relationship. Using an experiential exercise and client DVD, we will examine how to adapt mindfulness practice for people with distressing psychosis and explore how mindfulness practice needs to support new learning, or insight.

 

  1. Chadwick, P. (2005) Mindfulness Groups for people with Psychosis. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 33, 351-359
  2. Chadwick, P. (2006) Person-Based Cognitive Therapy for Distressing Psychosis. Wiley
  3. Chadwick, P. (2014) Mindfulness for Psychosis. The British Journal of Psychiatry,204: 333-334

 

By |2018-10-09T15:09:49+00:00October 9th, 2014|News|0 Comments